The path of yoga

A child’s consciousness will change all by itself into a teenager. There is no consciously “effort” driving this change. As the child ages, his body will transform and reach a point of maturity and then start a process of aging, decaying.
Observe that this process is not just about the body, but also about consciousness.

Is there at any point any need for “effort” to change?
There is no need. It just happens, and what happens is out of our control. It is in the Drama.

The path of yoga introduces the possibility for someone to change himself by sheer use of will power.
This change is according to a particular belief, a particular morality considered to be “right or good.”

A follower of the path of yoga is interested in “DOING the right thing.”

This entails the belief that right now, as we are; we need “improvement.” This improvement is conceptualized by agreement of what SHOULD BE “good or right.”

In Brahma Kumaris to be “right” is supported by the belief that a set of behaviors are considered to be given by God. In other words, to DO something “right”, according to a direction given by God. Your belief in God creates the need to comply with God; according to someone’s concept or experience of what God SHOULD BE.

This is how yoga starts. “Union” or yoga is identified as becoming someone “better,” by using our will power to change ourselves.
“Becoming better” is accomplished by not DOING some things and by DOING others, that is; it is about BEHAVIOR.
To follow a set of “nice” words called “virtues” become the goal, for that; rejection of who we are “now” by suppression and repression becomes part of the training of not DOING.

Therefore, Yoga becomes the path of inner fight. The path of inner struggle.

I am angry, but I want to become anger free. I will “work on it” by becoming aware when anger appears so I could suppress it, or by minimizing the situations that could start my anger, that is by controlling Life. This is a continuous inner fight. It is believed that at one point through “practice”, anger will go away…

However, anger will be there as long as compassion is needed. Ego will be there as long as the mind exists to separate. Attachment will be there as long as ego exists. That is the untold dilemma of Yoga.

The continuous inner struggle is like the metaphorical fish going against the current of the River. Where is the fish going? This stubbornness or courage will lead the fish into some sort of imagined glory among other fish, if it survives.
All of this “effort” only strengthens the idea of separation between “I” and the rest, thus it fortifies the ego.

This path of yoga however, is part of the journey. For ego needs to grow up, to build itself up in order to disintegrate itself, to dilute itself.

What happens when ego dilutes?
There is no fish to struggle against the waters of the River, although; there is a fish. Where is the fish going?
That is no longer a good question. There is no fish, so who is going where?  but there is River… although, there is a fish.
How could there be a fish but yet not be a fish? That is illogical!
That cannot be understood by Yoga… even though, there is “knowledge” of the eternally predestined Drama.

Brahma Kumaris’ path relies on the yoga of the “I.”

For the common good.

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