Changing “bad” into “good.”

In monotheistic religions, there is this emphasis on changing personal “bad” traits into “good” traits. That is what is known as “effort maker.” It takes effort, it is said.

Every religion has their own definitions of what is “good” or “bad.” That is the artificiality of those changes. 
Life does not work that way. In Life “good” and “bad” are nonexistent. Opposite forces are complementary of each other. Thus, that which is considered “bad” cannot exist without the “good.” 

When we are looking at “sanskaras” or personal traits,  it is the same exact way, because we are part of Life. Have you seen someone who displays courage? That one has the opposite quality as well (cowardice) in pretty much the same extent. “Cowardice” is not “bad,” but the direct consequence of being courageous. Opposites change continuously. We cannot be “courageous” all the time.

However, that is not what we have been taught. We have been taught to select “sanskaras” and work to achieve them at will, as if we were shopping in the supermarket. What we want to achieve is just an ideal, some mental construct that we think it “should be.”

In Brahma Kumaris, this idea of “changing sanskaras” is not congruent with the teaching of a predestined universe (Drama) for sanskaras are predetermined according to the role in Life. As nothing in Life in static, “good” or “bad,” those sanskaras move into their apparent opposite states. This may be hard to grasp for many. Therefore, it is understandable to follow such directions as to believe that “I” can change something deeply ingrained in “my” personality at a particular time.

Many could say “I changed some things in myself.” I may ask: How deep were those changes? Are those perhaps only superficial, as to disguise everyone around us and even ourselves? No?  Are those “changes” permanent in yourself or are those dependent on following a “protected life style” such as the one of a Brahma Kumaris follower? If you leave the religion, so do your “changes.”

A human being is not a mechanical device where someone could change parts at will. If the spiritual neophyte is concerned in changing things around in the name of “being good,” that is laudable but naïve. However, as expressed before; that experience is necessary to learn by being aware of the process. 

The idea of “changing sanskaras” may need to evolve into OBSERVING them, that is becoming AWARE of that who I AM. It is in the depth of AWARENESS where change resides. That change doesn’t have mental ideas of what a virtue should be. That change comes through deep introspection as to find the origin of exhibiting a particular behavior or emotion. That introspection  is not interested in moving in the opposite way to make a “change.” (i.e. To say to myself: From now on I will be courageous, when I exhibit cowardice.)

Emotions are like a mosquito bite. They will heal naturally for the most part. It may itch, but if I make a trauma out of an experience;  a strong emotion will remain deeply ingrained and come out affecting us through different behaviors at different times in our lives. Eventually, that will need emotional healing to open up to Life again.

Most individuals make Life into a traumatic experience, thus; their emotions are not balanced, but yet they attempt to change in themselves what they do not fully understand. No wonder the “power of yoga” becomes the panacea, in Brahma Kumaris.
Nevertheless; that is truly an example of a placebo effect:
It is not “bad,” but neither “good,” and if it works, then great! If it doesn’t, no big deal!

Advertisements