The “ugliness” of renunciation

In Brahma Kumaris, the word “renunciation” is glorified. To “renounce” something is a sign of “improvement” in the spiritual Life.
A neophyte follower will be at awe whenever a BK tells a story of renunciation.

“Look, he renounced his worldly family to join the BK family.” “She renounced sex to become a pure person.” “ He renounced his drinking habit to become better,” etc.
Renunciation has repression underneath.

I recall the story of a BK brother, who was born in a third world country. Through many “efforts” he was able to live in the USA. Through “effort” he had a good social position there. He had a family. After becoming a BK, he “lost” all those things unwillingly. Destiny made that happen. When he returned to his home country to visit, a well-known BK sister, gave the advice for him to “Do service in his country of origin.” Obviously, this BK brother wanted to “obey” and he followed the advice. Nevertheless, very few knew about the internal suffering he went through. The BK label for that state is “attachment.” This BK brother needed to break that attachment through his will power, yoga power and any other power, to become “successful,” a “worship worthy deity.”

Eventually, through another well -known BK sister, the BK brother had the “permission” to go back to the USA (save face.) After many years of working in the USA, this BK brother naturally developed a distaste for the USA. Eventually, he went back to his home country to live there. There was no “effort” of his part. No “ugly” renunciation to follow. This incident taught the BK follower an important lesson in Life. There is timing for everything.

The mental ideal of following a word, will not allow us to look inside. When we are naturally ready for the next step, there cannot be renunciation.
If there is renunciation of any kind, then there is repression, violence. Even if a drunk person “renounces” to drink a drop of alcohol in his life, that person is only repressing. That which is negated and repressed (renounced) will become more attractive, a temptation.
“Lead us not into temptation” is a popular prayer. Repression is inside. Inner violence is unavoidable.

A drunk person does not have self-love. That is the beginning of the “cure” and not to count how many days he has been sober. Of course, will-power is needed to start a process, but to believe that will power alone (translated as “renunciation”) will be able to “cure” is naïve.
BapDada has mentioned in the Avyakt Murlis that “the greatest renunciation is the one without renunciation.”

Life has its own timing. Life is not concerned with the agenda of a religious group, a leader or an ideal. The “sacrifice” of renunciation is not only ugly, but utterly violent when it is a mental ideal to follow.
In our society, we punish those who are violent towards others, but we oversee when there is inner violence towards the self.
Many religious followers are completely oblivious of all the damage that they are inflicting towards themselves. The ideal of not “harming others” is blindfolding them to look inside. That inner violence eventually will be unleashed toward others.

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